The Greatest Injustice

We all take pride in the character and life of our beloved Prophet (saws), and the fact that we believe in the perfect Message he preached for 23 years.

But is that enough? Is it enough to just say that we believe? Should that really make us feel accomplished as Muslims?

The Prophet (saws) went from being called “as-Sadiq” (the Truthful) and “al-Amin” (the Trustworthy), to being called a madman, fortune teller, and lying poet by the people who knew his impeccable character, just so he could deliver the incredible Message to mankind.
To us, it’s just a book, collecting dust on our highest shelves out of “respect.”

The Prophet (saws) went from being in a successful business partnership with his beautiful wife, Khadijah (may Allah be pleased with her), to being boycotted to the point of impoverishment and starvation, just because he stood up for the ultimate Truth.
We don’t even act on what we read of it.

These aren’t incidents from some fairy tale or fiction novel. We often forget that these are just a few of the many, and very real, hardships that occurred in the life of the Best of Creation (saws).
The Prophet (saws) had garbage thrown on him while reciting the Word of our Master (swt).
We don’t even bother ourselves to read merely a page of it in our safe homes every day.

The Prophet (saws) came so close to death on the battlefield that his followers thought he had actually died, just so he could ensure that someday, we would be able to recite the Book.
We have trouble sharing a word of it with our neighbors and friends out of fear of being called “preachy.”

The Prophet (saws) had stones pelted at him until his shoes were filled with blood, just so we would be able to benefit from his struggles and know the Message.
We daydream and send text messages while hearing its recitation.

These aren’t incidents from some fairy tale or fiction novel. We often forget that these are just a few of the many, and very real, hardships that occurred in the life of the Best of Creation (saws). The Best, no doubt, but still a man. He felt pain, just like we do. He sought Divine help, just like we do. And he had hopes, just like we do.

Hopes that his struggles wouldn’t be in vain. Hopes that his Message wouldn’t be forgotten. Hopes that this Qur’an would someday penetrate our hearts and influence our actions.

And the greatest injustice, the worst one of all, is to ignore the Message itself while claiming to appreciate the Messenger (saws).
The Qur’an: literally, that which is recited constantly; not just once, in childhood; not just at weddings; not just when somebody dies; not just when spirituality suffers a dip. That Book which is the absolute center of the life of the one who believes in it; the Guidance for all of humanity (2:185); the actual Word of the Creator and Master of the entire universe, and everything beyond that, especially delivered to us through the last Messenger (saws).

There’s a reason we’re told that the Qur’an will be a witness for or against us [Sahih Muslim]; we’re expected to act on it, which includes not committing injustice. And the greatest injustice, the worst one of all, is to ignore the Message itself while claiming to appreciate the Messenger (saws).

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